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2019-07-01 - Colloque/Présentation - poster - Anglais - 1 page(s)

Manya M, Bakari A, Keymeulen Florence, Kahumba J., Duez Pierre , Stévigny Caroline, Lumbu Simbi J.-B., "Antimalarial herbal remedies of Bukavu and Uvira, DR Congo" in 5èmes Journées AFERP, Angers, France, 2017

  • Codes CREF : Ethnographie (DI4122), Pharmacognosie (DI3410), Sciences pharmaceutiques (DI3400), Toxicologie pharmaceutique (DI3440)
  • Unités de recherche UMONS : Chimie thérapeutique et Pharmacognosie (M136)
  • Instituts UMONS : Institut des Sciences et Technologies de la Santé (Santé)
Texte intégral :

Abstract(s) :

(Anglais) Malaria, a major tropical parasitic disease caused by several species of Plasmodium, is particularly life threatening in sub-Saharan Africa [1, 2]. As many resistance problems are encountered with modern antimalarials, medicinal plants appear as promising sources for new and effective drugs [3]. The aim of this study was to collect and gather information on medicinal plants used against malaria in Bukavu and Uvira (Democratic Republic of Congo). Direct interviews with a field questionnaire allowed collecting ethnobotanical data; for each plant, a specimen was harvested in the presence of the interviewed traditional healers (THs). The recorded information includes vernacular names and parts of plants, methods of preparation and administration of remedies, dosage and treatment duration. Plants were identified in the herbarium of INERA/KIPOPO (RD Congo) and the Botanic Garden of Meise (Belgium), where voucher specimens have been deposited .The Relative Frequencies of Citation (RFC) have allowed to evaluate the local importance of each plant species. Interviewees cited 45 plant species belonging to 20 families for the preparation of 52 recipes, 25 multi-herbal and 27 mono-herbal, used for the treatment of malaria. Apart from the bark of Cinchona officinalis L. (Rubiaceae), the remedy of highest importance (RFC = 0.72), the study has highlighted that the most represented family is Asteraceae. Herbal medicines are mostly prepared from the leaves in the form of decoction and administered by oral route. In conclusion, the medicinal plants of Bukavu and Uvira traditionally used in the management of malaria should be preserved and evaluated as the identification and isolation of the active ingredients could contribute to the discovery of new and possibly more effective antimalarials.

(Anglais) Malaria, a major tropical parasitic disease caused by several species of Plasmodium, is particularly life threatening in sub-Saharan Africa [1, 2]. As many resistance problems are encountered with modern antimalarials, medicinal plants appear as promising sources for new and effective drugs [3]. The aim of this study was to collect and gather information on medicinal plants used against malaria in Bukavu and Uvira (Democratic Republic of Congo). Direct interviews with a field questionnaire allowed collecting ethnobotanical data; for each plant, a specimen was harvested in the presence of the interviewed traditional healers (THs). The recorded information includes vernacular names and parts of plants, methods of preparation and administration of remedies, dosage and treatment duration. Plants were identified in the herbarium of INERA/KIPOPO (RD Congo) and the Botanic Garden of Meise (Belgium), where voucher specimens have been deposited .The Relative Frequencies of Citation (RFC) have allowed to evaluate the local importance of each plant species. Interviewees cited 45 plant species belonging to 20 families for the preparation of 52 recipes, 25 multi-herbal and 27 mono-herbal, used for the treatment of malaria. Apart from the bark of Cinchona officinalis L. (Rubiaceae), the remedy of highest importance (RFC = 0.72), the study has highlighted that the most represented family is Asteraceae. Herbal medicines are mostly prepared from the leaves in the form of decoction and administered by oral route. In conclusion, the medicinal plants of Bukavu and Uvira traditionally used in the management of malaria should be preserved and evaluated as the identification and isolation of the active ingredients could contribute to the discovery of new and possibly more effective antimalarials.

(Anglais) Malaria, a major tropical parasitic disease caused by several species of Plasmodium, is particularly life threatening in sub-Saharan Africa [1, 2]. As many resistance problems are encountered with modern antimalarials, medicinal plants appear as promising sources for new and effective drugs [3]. The aim of this study was to collect and gather information on medicinal plants used against malaria in Bukavu and Uvira (Democratic Republic of Congo). Direct interviews with a field questionnaire allowed collecting ethnobotanical data; for each plant, a specimen was harvested in the presence of the interviewed traditional healers (THs). The recorded information includes vernacular names and parts of plants, methods of preparation and administration of remedies, dosage and treatment duration. Plants were identified in the herbarium of INERA/KIPOPO (RD Congo) and the Botanic Garden of Meise (Belgium), where voucher specimens have been deposited .The Relative Frequencies of Citation (RFC) have allowed to evaluate the local importance of each plant species. Interviewees cited 45 plant species belonging to 20 families for the preparation of 52 recipes, 25 multi-herbal and 27 mono-herbal, used for the treatment of malaria. Apart from the bark of Cinchona officinalis L. (Rubiaceae), the remedy of highest importance (RFC = 0.72), the study has highlighted that the most represented family is Asteraceae. Herbal medicines are mostly prepared from the leaves in the form of decoction and administered by oral route. In conclusion, the medicinal plants of Bukavu and Uvira traditionally used in the management of malaria should be preserved and evaluated as the identification and isolation of the active ingredients could contribute to the discovery of new and possibly more effective antimalarials.