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2020-08-29 - Colloque/Présentation - communication orale - Anglais - page(s)

Aloisio Loïc , "Heterotopias in Han Song’s Science Fiction" in Earth and its Others: the Geographies of Science Fiction, Fribourg, Suisse, 2020

  • Codes CREF : Langues et littératures (DI5360), Langues et littératures d'Asie du sud et du sud-est, chinois (DI536Q)
  • Unités de recherche UMONS : Communication écrite (T203)
  • Instituts UMONS : Institut de recherche en sciences et technologies du langage (Langage)
  • Centres UMONS : Ciéphumons (CIEPH)

Abstract(s) :

(Anglais) Michel Foucault uses the medical term “heterotopia”—which originally refers to the presence of an organ or tissues in a place where they shouldn’t be—to describe a place that exists in reality and is used as a mirror, thus reflecting certain values of the culture and the society in which it exists. These heterotopias therefore tell us something about these cultures and societies, whether it be with their characteristics or their separateness. Henceforth, I will use this concept to illustrate how Han Song uses these “other places” to comment on the society described in his works. Han Song likes to use enclosed or isolated spaces (such as subways, trains, airplanes, islands, hospitals, etc.), in which characters face alternative realities and social orders. These “other places” are then used as a magnifying lens or an inverted mirror of the author’s reality; thereby emphasizing the most pressing issues current Chinese society is facing today.

(Anglais) Michel Foucault uses the medical term “heterotopia”—which originally refers to the presence of an organ or tissues in a place where they shouldn’t be—to describe a place that exists in reality and is used as a mirror, thus reflecting certain values of the culture and the society in which it exists. These heterotopias therefore tell us something about these cultures and societies, whether it be with their characteristics or their separateness. Henceforth, I will use this concept to illustrate how Han Song uses these “other places” to comment on the society described in his works. Han Song likes to use enclosed or isolated spaces (such as subways, trains, airplanes, islands, hospitals, etc.), in which characters face alternative realities and social orders. These “other places” are then used as a magnifying lens or an inverted mirror of the author’s reality; thereby emphasizing the most pressing issues current Chinese society is facing today.