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2022-02-26 - Article/Dans un journal avec peer-review - Anglais - 21 page(s)

Romariz Peixoto Larissa , "Citizen Participation in Architecture and Urban Planning Confronted with Arnstein’s Ladder: Four Experiments into Popular Neighbourhoods of Hainaut Demonstrate Another Hierarchy" in Architecture, 2, 114-134, https://doi.org/10.3390/architecture2010007

  • Edition : VNU Business Publications (Netherlands)
  • Codes CREF : Sociologie urbaine (DI4134), Urbanisme et architecture (aspect sociologique) (DI2650)
  • Unités de recherche UMONS : Architecture et Société (A530)
  • Instituts UMONS : Institut de Recherche interdisciplinaire sur les enjeux sociétaux et territoriaux (Soci&Ter)
  • Centres UMONS : Urbanisation Revitalisation Bâtiment Architecture Innovations Espaces (URBAINE)
Texte intégral :

Abstract(s) :

(Anglais) Widely used and disseminated, Arnstein’s ladder is considered a reference for citizen participation. It, nevertheless, involves a recurrent bias and a certain confusion when confronted with projects in the Belgian and French working-class districts of cross-border Hainaut. Characterised by fundamentally opposed management systems (one bureaucratic and hierarchical, the other democratic or even delegative), these worksites challenge Arnstein’s concepts and allow us to understand that information is not a level in the participation ladder, but the condition for the functioning of the whole system. Likewise, they also teach us that manipulation and delegation are not opposite extremes but can percolate in any level of participation. Finally, they reveal that the interlocking of powers and the interplay of stakeholders can easily turn the established participation mechanism from exemplary to revolting and vice versa.

(Anglais) Widely used and disseminated, Arnstein’s ladder is considered a reference for 13 citizen participation. It nevertheless involves a recurrent bias and a certain confusion 14 when confronted with projects in the Belgian and French working-class districts of cross- 15 border Hainaut. Characterised by fundamentally opposed management systems (one 16 bureaucratic and hierarchical, the other democratic or even delegative), these worksites 17 challenge Arnstein's concepts and allow us to understand that information is not a level 18 in the participation ladder, but the condition for the functioning of the whole system. 19 Likewise, they also teach us that manipulation and delegation are not opposite extremes 20 but can percolate in any level of participation. Finally, they reveal that the interlocking 21 of powers and the interplay of stakeholders can easily turn the established participation 22 mechanism from virtuous to unhealthy and vice versa.


Mots-clés :
  • (Anglais) participation
  • (Anglais) popular neighborhood
  • (Anglais) urban planning