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2021-11-08 - Livre/Chapitre ou partie - Anglais - 20 page(s)

Mazy Kristel , "Wastelands at Port-City Interfaces. The search for water spaces to evade the constant hustle and bustle of city life" in Di Pietro Francesca, Robert Amélie, "Urban wastelands: a form of urban nature?" , 978-3-030-74881-4

  • Edition : Editions Springer
  • Codes CREF : Aménagement urbain (DI2652), Urbanisme et architecture (aspect sociologique) (DI2650)
  • Unités de recherche UMONS : Projets, Ville et Territoire (A520)
  • Instituts UMONS : Institut de Recherche en Développement Humain et des Organisations (HumanOrg)
  • Centres UMONS : Urbanisation Revitalisation Bâtiment Architecture Innovations Espaces (URBAINE)
Texte intégral :

Abstract(s) :

(Anglais) Port-city interfaces, near urban centers, are under intense land pressure within the context of increased competition for the development of these sites. Some interfaces are wastelands, induced by the remoteness of port installations from urban centers. For other interfaces, the word “wasteland” can be instrumentalized by planners to reallocate underused, yet active, port spaces. This paper aims to highlight the points of view of users, mostly inhabitants of these neighborhoods, in Brussels and Lille, based on a study of territorial representations. This study shows that these representations are clearly different from the conflictual environment of decisionmaking. The representation of a “quiet space” and a “breathing, natural space,” for leisure and relaxation, dominates the discourse of users. These representations make sense in very densely built environments, which are landlocked by the passage of major transport infrastructures.This desire for temporarywithdrawal can be related to moments allowing daily pressures to be relieved. The development of port-city interfaces as true interstitial breathing spaces within urbanized spaces could be explored for planners.