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2019-09-05 - Colloque/Présentation - communication orale - Anglais - 1 page(s)

Basaglia-Pappas Sandrine, Laurent Bernard, Borg Céline, Simoes Loureiro Isabelle , Lefebvre Laurent , "Interrelationship between language and executive functions in primary progressive aphasia." in 7th Meeting of the Federation of the European Societies of Neuropsychology (FESN), Milan, 5th to 7th September 2019., Italy, 2019

  • Codes CREF : Psychopathologie (DI3513), Neurosciences cognitives (DI4296), Sciences cognitives (DI4290), Psychologie cognitive (DI4211)
  • Unités de recherche UMONS : Psychologie cognitive et Neuropsychologie (P325)
  • Instituts UMONS : Institut de recherche en sciences et technologies du langage (Langage), Institut des Sciences et Technologies de la Santé (Santé)
  • Centres UMONS : Centre de recherche interdisciplinaire en Psychophysiologie et Electrophysiologie de la cognition (CIPsE), Mind & Health (CREMH)

Abstract(s) :

(Anglais) Interrelationship between language and executive functions in primary progressive aphasia Sandrine Basaglia-Pappas1,2, Bernard Laurent1, Céline Borg1, Isabelle Simoes Loureiro2, Laurent Lefebvre2 1CHU Nord, CMRR, Neuropsychology department, Saint-Etienne, France 2University of Mons, Cognitive Psychology and Neuropsychology department, Belgium Objectives. Executive functions (EF) disorders may be present in primary progessive aphasia (PPA)[1]. In this study, we aimed to describe language and executive profiles of the three variants of PPA[2] (non-fluent/agrammatic (nf/aPPA), semantic (svPPA), and logopenic (lvPPA)) and to analyze the relationship between these functions in PPA compared to controls. Method. We recruited 98 participants who met the criteria for PPA[3] -22 nf/avPPA, 25 svPPA, 21 lvPPA, and 41 healthy controls. Materials. Participants underwent a language and EF assessment: discourse, confrontation naming, fluency, repetition, working memory, Trail Making Test, Stroop test, tower of London and design fluency. Results. Analyses revealed that scores on most of the measures differed significantly in PPA groups relative to controls. Only repetition, working memory and design fluency were preserved in svPPA. The principal components analysis (PCA) yielded all language and executive tests onto one factor for controls, but not for PPA groups. Regression analysis highlighted relationships between language and executive tests in all groups. Discussion. Executive difficulties are observed in the three variants of PPA. The interrelation between language and executive functions is less obvious in patients than in controls. Conclusions. These findings show that executive dysfunction is observed at the early stage of the disease and that the relationship between language and EF is complex. 247 mots [1] Macoir, J., Lavoie, M., Laforce, R., Brambati, S. M., & Wilson, M. A. (2017). Dysexecutive symptoms in primary progressive aphasia: beyond diagnostic criteria. Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry and Neurology, 30(3), 151–161. [2] Mesulam, M. M. (1982). Slowly progressive aphasia without generalized dementia. Annals of neurology, 11: 592-598. [3] Gorno-Tempini, M.L., Hillis, A.E., Weintraub, S., Kertesz, A., Mendez, M., Cappa, S.F., Ogar, J.M., Rohrer, J.D., Black, S., Boeve, B.F., Manes, F., Dronkers, N.F., Vandenberghe, R., Rascovski, K., Patterson, K., Miller, B.L., Knopman, D.S., Hodges, J.R., Mesulam, M.M., Grossman, M. (2011). Classification of primary progressive aphasia and its variants. Neurology, 76(11), 1006-1014.

(Anglais) Executive functions (EF) disorders may be present in primary progessive aphasia (PPA)[1]. In this study, we aimed to describe language and executive profiles of the three variants of PPA[2] (non-fluent/agrammatic (nf/aPPA), semantic (svPPA), and logopenic (lvPPA)) and to analyze the relationship between these functions in PPA compared to controls. Method. We recruited 98 participants who met the criteria for PPA[3] -22 nf/avPPA, 25 svPPA, 21 lvPPA, and 41 healthy controls. Materials. Participants underwent a language and EF assessment: discourse, confrontation naming, fluency, repetition, working memory, Trail Making Test, Stroop test, tower of London and design fluency. Results. Analyses revealed that scores on most of the measures differed significantly in PPA groups relative to controls. Only repetition, working memory and design fluency were preserved in svPPA. The principal components analysis (PCA) yielded all language and executive tests onto one factor for controls, but not for PPA groups. Regression analysis highlighted relationships between language and executive tests in all groups. Discussion. Executive difficulties are observed in the three variants of PPA. The interrelation between language and executive functions is less obvious in patients than in controls. Conclusions. These findings show that executive dysfunction is observed at the early stage of the disease and that the relationship between language and EF is complex. 247 mots [1] Macoir, J., Lavoie, M., Laforce, R., Brambati, S. M., & Wilson, M. A. (2017). Dysexecutive symptoms in primary progressive aphasia: beyond diagnostic criteria. Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry and Neurology, 30(3), 151–161. [2] Mesulam, M. M. (1982). Slowly progressive aphasia without generalized dementia. Annals of neurology, 11: 592-598. [3] Gorno-Tempini, M.L., Hillis, A.E., Weintraub, S., Kertesz, A., Mendez, M., Cappa, S.F., Ogar, J.M., Rohrer, J.D., Black, S., Boeve, B.F., Manes, F., Dronkers, N.F., Vandenberghe, R., Rascovski, K., Patterson, K., Miller, B.L., Knopman, D.S., Hodges, J.R., Mesulam, M.M., Grossman, M. (2011). Classification of primary progressive aphasia and its variants. Neurology, 76(11), 1006-1014.

(Anglais) Interrelationship between language and executive functions in primary progressive aphasia Sandrine Basaglia-Pappas1,2, Bernard Laurent1, Céline Borg1, Isabelle Simoes Loureiro2, Laurent Lefebvre2 1CHU Nord, CMRR, Neuropsychology department, Saint-Etienne, France 2University of Mons, Cognitive Psychology and Neuropsychology department, Belgium Objectives. Executive functions (EF) disorders may be present in primary progessive aphasia (PPA)[1]. In this study, we aimed to describe language and executive profiles of the three variants of PPA[2] (non-fluent/agrammatic (nf/aPPA), semantic (svPPA), and logopenic (lvPPA)) and to analyze the relationship between these functions in PPA compared to controls. Method. We recruited 98 participants who met the criteria for PPA[3] -22 nf/avPPA, 25 svPPA, 21 lvPPA, and 41 healthy controls. Materials. Participants underwent a language and EF assessment: discourse, confrontation naming, fluency, repetition, working memory, Trail Making Test, Stroop test, tower of London and design fluency. Results. Analyses revealed that scores on most of the measures differed significantly in PPA groups relative to controls. Only repetition, working memory and design fluency were preserved in svPPA. The principal components analysis (PCA) yielded all language and executive tests onto one factor for controls, but not for PPA groups. Regression analysis highlighted relationships between language and executive tests in all groups. Discussion. Executive difficulties are observed in the three variants of PPA. The interrelation between language and executive functions is less obvious in patients than in controls. Conclusions. These findings show that executive dysfunction is observed at the early stage of the disease and that the relationship between language and EF is complex. 247 mots [1] Macoir, J., Lavoie, M., Laforce, R., Brambati, S. M., & Wilson, M. A. (2017). Dysexecutive symptoms in primary progressive aphasia: beyond diagnostic criteria. Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry and Neurology, 30(3), 151–161. [2] Mesulam, M. M. (1982). Slowly progressive aphasia without generalized dementia. Annals of neurology, 11: 592-598. [3] Gorno-Tempini, M.L., Hillis, A.E., Weintraub, S., Kertesz, A., Mendez, M., Cappa, S.F., Ogar, J.M., Rohrer, J.D., Black, S., Boeve, B.F., Manes, F., Dronkers, N.F., Vandenberghe, R., Rascovski, K., Patterson, K., Miller, B.L., Knopman, D.S., Hodges, J.R., Mesulam, M.M., Grossman, M. (2011). Classification of primary progressive aphasia and its variants. Neurology, 76(11), 1006-1014.

(Anglais) Executive functions (EF) disorders may be present in primary progessive aphasia (PPA)[1]. In this study, we aimed to describe language and executive profiles of the three variants of PPA[2] (non-fluent/agrammatic (nf/aPPA), semantic (svPPA), and logopenic (lvPPA)) and to analyze the relationship between these functions in PPA compared to controls. Method. We recruited 98 participants who met the criteria for PPA[3] -22 nf/avPPA, 25 svPPA, 21 lvPPA, and 41 healthy controls. Materials. Participants underwent a language and EF assessment: discourse, confrontation naming, fluency, repetition, working memory, Trail Making Test, Stroop test, tower of London and design fluency. Results. Analyses revealed that scores on most of the measures differed significantly in PPA groups relative to controls. Only repetition, working memory and design fluency were preserved in svPPA. The principal components analysis (PCA) yielded all language and executive tests onto one factor for controls, but not for PPA groups. Regression analysis highlighted relationships between language and executive tests in all groups. Discussion. Executive difficulties are observed in the three variants of PPA. The interrelation between language and executive functions is less obvious in patients than in controls. Conclusions. These findings show that executive dysfunction is observed at the early stage of the disease and that the relationship between language and EF is complex. 247 mots [1] Macoir, J., Lavoie, M., Laforce, R., Brambati, S. M., & Wilson, M. A. (2017). Dysexecutive symptoms in primary progressive aphasia: beyond diagnostic criteria. Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry and Neurology, 30(3), 151–161. [2] Mesulam, M. M. (1982). Slowly progressive aphasia without generalized dementia. Annals of neurology, 11: 592-598. [3] Gorno-Tempini, M.L., Hillis, A.E., Weintraub, S., Kertesz, A., Mendez, M., Cappa, S.F., Ogar, J.M., Rohrer, J.D., Black, S., Boeve, B.F., Manes, F., Dronkers, N.F., Vandenberghe, R., Rascovski, K., Patterson, K., Miller, B.L., Knopman, D.S., Hodges, J.R., Mesulam, M.M., Grossman, M. (2011). Classification of primary progressive aphasia and its variants. Neurology, 76(11), 1006-1014.

(Anglais) Executive functions (EF) disorders may be present in primary progessive aphasia (PPA)[1]. In this study, we aimed to describe language and executive profiles of the three variants of PPA[2] (non-fluent/agrammatic (nf/aPPA), semantic (svPPA), and logopenic (lvPPA)) and to analyze the relationship between these functions in PPA compared to controls. Method. We recruited 98 participants who met the criteria for PPA[3] -22 nf/avPPA, 25 svPPA, 21 lvPPA, and 41 healthy controls. Materials. Participants underwent a language and EF assessment: discourse, confrontation naming, fluency, repetition, working memory, Trail Making Test, Stroop test, tower of London and design fluency. Results. Analyses revealed that scores on most of the measures differed significantly in PPA groups relative to controls. Only repetition, working memory and design fluency were preserved in svPPA. The principal components analysis (PCA) yielded all language and executive tests onto one factor for controls, but not for PPA groups. Regression analysis highlighted relationships between language and executive tests in all groups. Discussion. Executive difficulties are observed in the three variants of PPA. The interrelation between language and executive functions is less obvious in patients than in controls. Conclusions. These findings show that executive dysfunction is observed at the early stage of the disease and that the relationship between language and EF is complex. 247 mots [1] Macoir, J., Lavoie, M., Laforce, R., Brambati, S. M., & Wilson, M. A. (2017). Dysexecutive symptoms in primary progressive aphasia: beyond diagnostic criteria. Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry and Neurology, 30(3), 151–161. [2] Mesulam, M. M. (1982). Slowly progressive aphasia without generalized dementia. Annals of neurology, 11: 592-598. [3] Gorno-Tempini, M.L., Hillis, A.E., Weintraub, S., Kertesz, A., Mendez, M., Cappa, S.F., Ogar, J.M., Rohrer, J.D., Black, S., Boeve, B.F., Manes, F., Dronkers, N.F., Vandenberghe, R., Rascovski, K., Patterson, K., Miller, B.L., Knopman, D.S., Hodges, J.R., Mesulam, M.M., Grossman, M. (2011). Classification of primary progressive aphasia and its variants. Neurology, 76(11), 1006-1014.

(Anglais) Executive functions (EF) disorders may be present in primary progessive aphasia (PPA)[1]. In this study, we aimed to describe language and executive profiles of the three variants of PPA[2] (non-fluent/agrammatic (nf/aPPA), semantic (svPPA), and logopenic (lvPPA)) and to analyze the relationship between these functions in PPA compared to controls. Method. We recruited 98 participants who met the criteria for PPA[3] -22 nf/avPPA, 25 svPPA, 21 lvPPA, and 41 healthy controls. Materials. Participants underwent a language and EF assessment: discourse, confrontation naming, fluency, repetition, working memory, Trail Making Test, Stroop test, tower of London and design fluency. Results. Analyses revealed that scores on most of the measures differed significantly in PPA groups relative to controls. Only repetition, working memory and design fluency were preserved in svPPA. The principal components analysis (PCA) yielded all language and executive tests onto one factor for controls, but not for PPA groups. Regression analysis highlighted relationships between language and executive tests in all groups. Discussion. Executive difficulties are observed in the three variants of PPA. The interrelation between language and executive functions is less obvious in patients than in controls. Conclusions. These findings show that executive dysfunction is observed at the early stage of the disease and that the relationship between language and EF is complex.

(Anglais) Executive functions (EF) disorders may be present in primary progessive aphasia (PPA)[1]. In this study, we aimed to describe language and executive profiles of the three variants of PPA[2] (non-fluent/agrammatic (nf/aPPA), semantic (svPPA), and logopenic (lvPPA)) and to analyze the relationship between these functions in PPA compared to controls. Method. We recruited 98 participants who met the criteria for PPA[3] -22 nf/avPPA, 25 svPPA, 21 lvPPA, and 41 healthy controls. Materials. Participants underwent a language and EF assessment: discourse, confrontation naming, fluency, repetition, working memory, Trail Making Test, Stroop test, tower of London and design fluency. Results. Analyses revealed that scores on most of the measures differed significantly in PPA groups relative to controls. Only repetition, working memory and design fluency were preserved in svPPA. The principal components analysis (PCA) yielded all language and executive tests onto one factor for controls, but not for PPA groups. Regression analysis highlighted relationships between language and executive tests in all groups. Discussion. Executive difficulties are observed in the three variants of PPA. The interrelation between language and executive functions is less obvious in patients than in controls. Conclusions. These findings show that executive dysfunction is observed at the early stage of the disease and that the relationship between language and EF is complex. 247 mots [1] Macoir, J., Lavoie, M., Laforce, R., Brambati, S. M., & Wilson, M. A. (2017). Dysexecutive symptoms in primary progressive aphasia: beyond diagnostic criteria. Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry and Neurology, 30(3), 151–161. [2] Mesulam, M. M. (1982). Slowly progressive aphasia without generalized dementia. Annals of neurology, 11: 592-598. [3] Gorno-Tempini, M.L., Hillis, A.E., Weintraub, S., Kertesz, A., Mendez, M., Cappa, S.F., Ogar, J.M., Rohrer, J.D., Black, S., Boeve, B.F., Manes, F., Dronkers, N.F., Vandenberghe, R., Rascovski, K., Patterson, K., Miller, B.L., Knopman, D.S., Hodges, J.R., Mesulam, M.M., Grossman, M. (2011). Classification of primary progressive aphasia and its variants. Neurology, 76(11), 1006-1014.