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2017-10-06 - Colloque/Présentation - communication orale - Anglais - 1 page(s)

Kalonji N.J.B., Boakanya I.A., Kalonji M.B.G., Mwamba Pierrot T., Duez Pierre , "Practice of geophagia by pregnant women in the Democratic Republic of Congo – Katanga epidemiological data" in Joint 5th SASA International Conference & 2nd Rwanda Biotechnology Conference, "Translational science and biotechnology advances in Africa", Kigali, Rwanda, 2017

  • Codes CREF : Chimie analytique (DI1314), Pharmacognosie (DI3410), Sciences pharmaceutiques (DI3400), Toxicologie pharmaceutique (DI3440)
  • Unités de recherche UMONS : Chimie thérapeutique et Pharmacognosie (M136)
  • Instituts UMONS : Institut des Sciences et Technologies de la Santé (Santé)

Abstract(s) :

(Anglais) Geophagia is a common practice in Africa where many cases of picas are reported. During pregnancy, Congolese women manifest taste perversion and searching to eat various meals. They like precious and rare foods, earth also, despite the criticisms. A survey of 1099 pregnant women was carried out in Kamina, Kolwezi and Lubumbashi from September 2014 to March 2015 to assess the importance of this practice and its perception by people concerned. They have been mitten in health centers, markets, homes and their work places. All of them acknowledged that they “ate a bit of earth” in their lives. More than 90% (1012) admitted to using Pemba (clay), Kinkalabwe (Limestone) or Bulongo (Earth) during their pregnancy. Financial possibilities, availability or habit justified the choice of either product: natural, smoked or salted. The majority were adults despite the presence of some minors. Although some did not attend school, the main group of them had a higher education (8%). The principal motivation of geophagia (60%) relates to malaise due to pregnancy ranging from nausea to “bad mood”. Some (17%) admitted to being satisfied with it as a meal, others (36%) considered this practice to be just standard for each pregnant woman. The third party recognized the possibility of side effects by minimizing them, whether constipation (37%) or spotted child; Maternal anemia and the birth of a low-weight child had lower scores of 17 and 9%. The prevalence of geophagia in Congolese pregnant women, whatever their sociocultural profile, is important. This practice has an impact on the parturient and on the unborn child. Stopping these habits can introduce other setbacks that are difficult to assess. The valuation of pregnant women geophagia is a pathway that must be borrowed to improve safety and activity of substances eaten.

(Anglais) Geophagia is a common practice in Africa where many cases of picas are reported. During pregnancy, Congolese women manifest taste perversion and searching to eat various meals. They like precious and rare foods, earth also, despite the criticisms. A survey of 1099 pregnant women was carried out in Kamina, Kolwezi and Lubumbashi from September 2014 to March 2015 to assess the importance of this practice and its perception by people concerned. They have been mitten in health centers, markets, homes and their work places. All of them acknowledged that they “ate a bit of earth” in their lives. More than 90% (1012) admitted to using Pemba (clay), Kinkalabwe (Limestone) or Bulongo (Earth) during their pregnancy. Financial possibilities, availability or habit justified the choice of either product: natural, smoked or salted. The majority were adults despite the presence of some minors. Although some did not attend school, the main group of them had a higher education (8%). The principal motivation of geophagia (60%) relates to malaise due to pregnancy ranging from nausea to “bad mood”. Some (17%) admitted to being satisfied with it as a meal, others (36%) considered this practice to be just standard for each pregnant woman. The third party recognized the possibility of side effects by minimizing them, whether constipation (37%) or spotted child; Maternal anemia and the birth of a low-weight child had lower scores of 17 and 9%. The prevalence of geophagia in Congolese pregnant women, whatever their sociocultural profile, is important. This practice has an impact on the parturient and on the unborn child. Stopping these habits can introduce other setbacks that are difficult to assess. The valuation of pregnant women geophagia is a pathway that must be borrowed to improve safety and activity of substances eaten.