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2017-07-16 - Article/Dans un journal avec peer-review - Anglais - 12 page(s)

Balemba Eddy, "Customer Satisfaction with services of microfinance Institutions: scale development and validation" in Strategic Change, 26, 6, 563-574, 10.1002/jsc.2168

  • Edition : John Wiley & Sons, Inc. - Business
  • Codes CREF : Economie des PVD (DI4375)
  • Unités de recherche UMONS : Economie et gestion de l'entreprise (W742)
  • Instituts UMONS : Institut de Recherche en Développement Humain et des Organisations (HumanOrg)
  • Centres UMONS : Microfinance (CERMI)

Abstract(s) :

(Anglais) Customer satisfaction is a multidimensional construct with five factors: price, reliability, accessibility and flexibility, appearance, social and enhancement of customers. The presence of social inclusion and customer enhancement, accessibility, and flexibility dimensions reveals that a scale measurement should be specific both to a context and to a sector. The value attached to the appearance factor confirms that microfinance seriously tends to “mission drift” which means targeting less poor customers. The simultaneous occurrence of appearance and social dimensions in the same scale is proof that the social and financial goals should coexist in all stages of the development of microfinance institutions. As long as the social funds do not substitute market funds used in financing poor microborrowers, the share of poor clients served increases. So does financial inclusion of the poor.

(Anglais) Customer satisfaction is a multidimensional construct with five factors: price, reliability, accessibility and flexibility, appearance, social and enhancement of customers. The presence of social inclusion and customer enhancement, accessibility, and flexibility dimensions reveals that a scale measurement should be specific both to a context and to a sector. The value attached to the appearance factor confirms that microfinance seriously tends to “mission drift” which means targeting less poor customers. The simultaneous occurrence of appearance and social dimensions in the same scale is proof that the social and financial goals should coexist in all stages of the development of microfinance institutions. As long as the social funds do not substitute market funds used in financing poor microborrowers, the share of poor clients served increases. So does financial inclusion of the poor.